5 Important Things To Do If Your Pet Has FLEAS

Hello, readers! So, if you’ve stuck around for the last week or two, you’ve been with me as we hammered the topic of fleas and flea prevention into dirt (flea dirt, to be exact).

Today, we’re going to wrap up with something short, sweet, and important! Many people (myself included) find themselves in a flea induced panic at least once in their life. Here is a quick guide to help you keep your head on straight so that you can help your pets and get rid of your fleas ASAP.

If you notice that your pet has fleas, you should:

  1. Don’t panic. Take a deep breath, then proceed to step two.
  2. Get some flea prevention. Call your vet. If you’ve been to the vet within the last 6-12 months, they should be able to get you some effective flea prevention that starts working within hours. As a reminder, I recommend these products for dogs and cats. I do NOT recommend these products.
  3. Treat Your Environment. Remember that a large portion of a flea problem is actually in your environment- your yard, your carpet, your furniture. Call an exterminator for the best recommendations on how to treat your home in a way that is safe for your family and also effective. If you can’t hire an exterminator, make sure you follow the instructions on over-the-counter pesticide product labels carefully. Wash your bedding, steam clean your carpet and furniture, and vacuum frequently.
  4. Keep using flea prevention for at least 4 months… and then year round. It takes at least 4 months to get rid of an active flea infestation, as fleas in the environment may hatch, hop on your pet, and start the process all over again. After the infestation has resolved, I recommend year-round flea prevention for all pets. Why treat the problem again when you can simply prevent it?
  5. Watch Out for Flea Related Illnesses. Usually, these are fairly mild. Tapeworms are very common, and they are spread when an animal ingests a flea while licking/chewing. Tapeworms can be easily identified when an owner sees small, rice-like worms around the pet’s rear end or on bedding. They can cause GI upset and, in severe cases, malnutrition. More serious illnesses, like bacterial infections spread by fleas, can also occur. If your pet is ill and has had fleas recently, make sure you tell your vet so that they can help diagnose the problem.

Thanks for reading! How have you dealt with flea infestations in the past? How long did it take to see an improvement in your pet and your environment?

If you enjoyed this post, please like, comment, subscribe, or share! Check back on Thursday, where we will be tackling a new (but still itchy) topic, environmental allergies in pets!

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